Popocateptl
Popocateptl

WATERCOLOR PAINTING
I use bright colors and intricate patterns to integrate contemporary crises and mythological references into my personal experience. I don’t set out to create themes about death but somehow, get there. After all, the art is a record of an event that passes. When I first touch brush to paper, I rarely have a firm plan but allow the mere spark of an idea to ignite the process. When I visited “Popocatéptl”, the active volcano in Central Mexico, its long history and vitality fascinated me. Perhaps, I was just suffering altitude sickness but I imagined demons dancing inside that mountain. When I returned home to my studio, the rhythm of applying the dense colors led to my dizzying interpretation. (Epilogue: I sold this painting that was later exhibited in a show and someone stole it off the wall!)
Watermedia on cold press Archés 22 x 30 paper

Grant Him Immortality"Book of Turns"
Grant Him Immortality
“Book of Turns”

ILLUSTRATED MANUSCRIPTS
My fascination with illuminated manuscripts led me to invent my own under the theme title “Book of Turns.” This kind of comic book approach using heavily illustrated text, was historically employed across cultures to teach religious stories to an illiterate population. The term illumination refers to the preponderance of gold, which I sometimes use along with detailed borders. The subjects for my collection, like all my paintings, can be newsworthy or more personal. My first in the series is “Grant Him Immortality”, a memorial to a car accident victim I happened upon one rainy night. The body, shrouded in a red Hudson Bay blanket, lay on the pavement. The red lights of emergency vehicles washed the scene with an eerie glow. Red, Red, Red is repeated in calligraphy in the border where it can be construed as dred, dred, dred.
Watermedia on cold press Archés 22 x 30 paper

Ozarks
Ozarks
5 in. cube

NATURE BOXES
The series of paper boxes launched after my first bird-watching venture in the Ozarks. Though my research, I was thrilled to discover spectrograms, which are visual notations of bird songs. So, I playfully re-invented the marks as motifs. A small plastic record of humpback whale songs folded into a National Geographic magazine inspired the “Humpback Whale” and its fanciful spectrograms. Years later, when I snorkeled in Maui, I saw the humpbacks and heard them sing. The series continued with themes of birds, butterflies, trees, and rabbits. The flat sheets of Archés paper are painted with watercolor on both sides and then folded into a cube with a lid. No glue is used. The paintings inside the folded flaps are “secrets” hidden from view. The boxes fulfill my need to invent three-dimensional forms along with covering the surfaces with paint. It may seem crazy to put this much work into an object made of paper and watercolor but I love the materials. Paradoxically, with my attraction to the ephemeral quality of things, I do insist on using archival resources.
Watermedia on cold press Archés paper. Folded boxes range from 5 inch to 7 inch cubes.

Seated Nike
Seated Nike
18 in. w x 15 in. h x 10 in. deep

CERAMIC SCULPTURE
The glazed stoneware torso figures have mythological and ancient references. In Ovid’s account, Echo falls in love with Narcissus who doesn’t even notice her. While Echo’s body withers away until only her voice is left, Narcissus falls in love with his own image reflected in a pool of water. The paper-like sculptures of Echo and Narcissus are reflected in the mirror bases. Nike is the Greek goddess of victory. Typically depicted with wings as, the grand “Winged Victory of Samothrace” installed at the Louvre, my version is seated rather than in flight.